A look at the argument of descartes

The oldest child, Pierre, died soon after his birth on October 19, His sister, Jeanne, was probably born sometime the following year, while his surviving older brother, also named Pierre, was born on October 19, The Descartes clan was a bourgeois family composed of mostly doctors and some lawyers. Joachim Descartes fell into this latter category and spent most of his career as a member of the provincial parliament.

A look at the argument of descartes

The only possible ultimate causes are a myself b my always having existed c my parents d something less perfect than God e God 4.

If I had created myself, I would have made myself perfect. This does not solve the problem. If I am a dependent being, I need to be continually sustained by another. This leads to an infinite regress. The idea of perfection that exists in me cannot have originated from a non-perfect being.

Descartes argued that he had a clear and distinct idea of God. In the same way that the cogito was self-evident, so too is the existence of God, as his perfect idea of a perfect being could not have been caused by anything less than a perfect being. Concerning the True and the False[ edit ] The conclusions of the previous Meditations that "I" and "God" both exist lead to another problem: If God is perfectly good and the source of all that is, how is there room for error or falsehood?

Descartes attempts to answer this question in Meditation IV: On Truth and Falsity. If I've got everything in me from God and He hasn't given me the ability to make errors, it doesn't seem possible for me ever to be in error.

The framework of his arguments center on the Great Chain of Beingin which God's perfect goodness is relative to His perfect being.

On the extreme opposite end of the scale is complete nothingness, which is also the most evil state possible. Thus, humans are an intermediary between these two extremes, being less "real" or "good" than God, but more "real" and "good" than nothingness. Thus, error as a part of evil is not a positive reality, it is only the absence of what is correct.

In this way, its existence is allowed within the context of a perfectly inerrant God. I find that I am "intermediate" between God and nothingness, between the supreme entity and nonentity.

Insofar as I am the creation of the supreme entity, there's nothing in me to account for my being deceived or led into error, but, inasmuch as I somehow participate in nothing or nonentity — that is, insofar as I am distinct from the supreme entity itself and lack many things — it's not surprising that I go wrong.

I thus understand that, in itself, error is a lack, rather than a real thing dependent on God. Hence, I understand that I can err without God's having given me a special ability to do so. Rather, I fall into error because my God-given ability to judge the truth is not infinite.

Descartes also concedes two points that might allow for the possibility of his ability to make errors. First, he notes that it is very possible that his limited knowledge prevents him from understanding why God chose to create him so he could make mistakes.

If he could see the things that God could see, with a complete and infinite scope, perhaps he would judge his ability to err as the best option. He uses this point to attack the Aristotelian structure of causes.

The final cause described by Aristotle are the "what for" of an object, but Descartes claims that because he is unable to comprehend completely the mind of God, it is impossible to understand completely the " why " through science — only the "how".

I realize that I shouldn't be surprised at God's doing things that I can't explain. I shouldn't doubt His existence just because I find that I sometimes can't understand why or how He has made something.

I know that my nature is weak and limited and that God's is limitless, incomprehensible, and infinite, and, from this, I can infer that He can do innumerable things whose reasons are unknown to me. On this ground alone, I regard the common practice of explaining things in terms of their purposes to be useless in physics:René Descartes was born in La Haye en Touraine (now Descartes, Indre-et-Loire), France, on 31 March His mother, Jeanne Brochard, died soon after giving birth to him, and so he was not expected to survive.

Descartes' father, Joachim, was a member of the Parlement of Brittany at Rennes. René lived with his grandmother and with his great-uncle. A Brief Look at the Philosophy of Descartes Essay Words 4 Pages When Descartes created the Method of Doubt his main mission was to develop a method that would bring him to the real truth.

Descartes doesn’t give us a convincing argument for premise 3. At any rate, according to Descartes, God is at such a level of reality (being infinite and totally perfect) that nothing could cause the idea of god except God himself.

A look at the argument of descartes

René Descartes (—) René Descartes is often credited with being the “Father of Modern Philosophy.” This title is justified due both to his break with the traditional Scholastic-Aristotelian philosophy prevalent at his time and to his development and promotion of the new, mechanistic sciences.

René Descartes (–) was a creative mathematician of the first order, an important scientific thinker, and an original metaphysician. Meditations on First Philosophy in which the existence of God and the immortality of the soul are demonstrated (Latin: Meditationes de Prima Philosophia, in qua Dei existentia et animæ immortalitas demonstratur) is a philosophical treatise by René Descartes first published in Latin in The French translation (by the Duke of Luynes with Descartes' supervision) was published in as.

Descartes' Ontological Argument (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)